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An Interview with an AI About Ruby on Rails

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Glen Crawford
December 8, 2022

An Interview with an AI About Ruby on Rails

Earlier this week OpenAI, an Artificial Intelligence research laboratory co-founded by Elon Musk, released ChatGPT, a new model that is able to converse in an extremely human-like way. It is available now for research purposes, and since our Growth and Expansion Manager Monique is practically begging for blog posts about Ruby on Rails, I thought I would see if ChatGPT can do 99% of the work for me. Let’s give it a go, and as we do, bear in mind that the ChatGPT model isn’t actually connected to the internet, meaning that it isn’t looking up the relevant information on demand in order to answer: it already knows it.

Glen:

Hi, my name is Glen. Could you please help me write a blog post about Ruby on Rails, which is what my company, reinteractive, specializes in?

ChatGPT:

Sure, I’d be happy to help! Here are a few points you could include in your blog post about Ruby on Rails:

  • Ruby on Rails, often shortened to just Rails, is a popular open-source web development framework written in the Ruby programming language.
  • One of the key benefits of using Rails is that it allows developers to build applications quickly and efficiently, thanks to its use of convention over configuration and the availability of a wide range of pre-built libraries, known as “gems”.
  • Rails is known for its focus on simplicity and ease of use, which has made it a favorite among many web developers.
  • In addition to being used to build web applications, Rails is also well-suited to building APIs and other types of back-end systems.
  • Some well-known companies and services that use Rails include GitHub, Airbnb, and Shopify.

These are just a few ideas to get you started. You could also consider discussing some of the key features and components of Rails, such as ActiveRecord (which provides a database-agnostic interface for working with data), ActionMailer (which makes it easy to send emails from your application), and ActionCable (which allows you to build real-time features using WebSockets).

I hope this helps! Let me know if you have any other questions.

Glen:

That’s a shockingly good start! But I was thinking a bit more brief, no more than 50 words, and in the style of a pirate.

ChatGPT:

Sure thing, Glen! How about this:

“Ahoy mateys! Ruby on Rails be a fast, powerful web development framework built on the Ruby language. It be perfect for building agile, scalable applications that be sure to make ye a rich and successful pirate!”

Or, if you want to be a little more specific:

“Arrr, Ruby on Rails be the framework of choice for many a savvy pirate looking to build a quick and mighty web app. With its focus on convention over configuration, ye can be up and running in no time, ready to plunder the high seas of the internet!”

image

Glen:

Arrr, indeed! You didn’t mention anything about testing though, which would be a red flag in a job interview with us, due to its importance in this kind of software development. Could you explain why writing tests for our code is so important, in the style of a mafia boss?

ChatGPT:

Listen up, kid. In the world of web development, writing tests for your code is like making sure you’ve got backup muscle behind you. It’s what protects you and your application from getting whacked by bugs and technical debt. Trust me, you don’t want to be caught without tests, or you might end up sleeping with the fishes. Capiche?

Glen:

Did you just say “capiche”?

ChatGPT:

Yes, I did! “Capiche” is an Italian word that means “understood” or “got it.” It’s often used in conversation as a way of checking that the other person has understood what you’re saying. It’s similar to the English expression “got it?” or “do you understand?” I used it in my response to emphasize the importance of writing tests, as if I were a mafia boss making a demand of one of my subordinates. I apologize if my use of the word was confusing or out of place. Is there something else I can help you with?

Glen:

Let’s just stick to normal English. Now could you give me some tips to ensure good performance of a Ruby on Rails application?

ChatGPT:

Sure, Glen! Here are some tips to ensure good performance of a Ruby on Rails application:

  1. Use a fast and reliable database, such as PostgreSQL or MySQL, and optimize your database queries for performance.
  2. Use caching to store frequently accessed data in memory, reducing the need to retrieve it from the database on each request.
  3. Use a web server, such as Puma or Unicorn, that is optimized for handling multiple concurrent requests.
  4. Use a content delivery network (CDN) to serve static assets, such as images and stylesheets, from locations close to your users.
  5. Use a performance monitoring tool, such as New Relic or Skylight, to track the performance of your application and identify bottlenecks.
  6. Use a load testing tool, such as JMeter or Apache Bench, to simulate heavy traffic and test the scalability of your application.

Overall, ensuring good performance of a Ruby on Rails application requires a combination of careful planning, optimization, and monitoring. By following these tips, you can help ensure that your application runs smoothly and efficiently, even under heavy load.

Glen:

All good suggestions. But what about upgrading Ruby on Rails to keep it up-to-date as new versions come out? I know it’s critical for security fixes, but is it important for performance, too? Since the creator of Ruby, Matz, is Japanese, can you answer in Japanese?

ChatGPT:

はい、Ruby on Railsをアップグレードすることは、セキュリティ修正のためだけでなく、パフォーマンスの向上にも役立ちます。新しいバージョンがリリースされると、新しい機能や改善が含まれる場合があります。これらの機能や改善は、アプリケーションのパフォーマンスを向上させる可能性があります。また、Ruby on Railsのサポートが終了する前にアップグレードすることも重要です。これにより、セキュリティ上の問題を防ぐことができます。したがって、Ruby on Railsを定期的にアップグレードすることは、アプリケーションのセキュリティとパフォーマンスを維持するために重要です。

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Glen:

Okay, so Ruby on Rails has all these great features and tools for rapid development of web applications, but it’s not the only one; Python has them too, as do other languages, right? Answer in the form of Shakespeare characters debating between Ruby on Rails and an alternative.

ChatGPT:

Romeo: “But soft, what light through yonder window breaks? It is the east, and Ruby on Rails is the sun!”

Juliet: “Arise, fair sun, and kill the envious moon, who is already sick and pale with grief, that thou her maid art far more fair than she! But tell me, Romeo, why dost thou speak so highly of Ruby on Rails?”

Romeo: “Because, my love, it is the framework of choice for many a web developer, with its focus on convention over configuration and its vast array of pre-built modules and tools. It allows for rapid development of web applications, and is favored by many for its simplicity and power.”

Juliet: “But, Romeo, is it not true that other frameworks, such as Django or Flask, also offer similar benefits? And are they not built on more widely used languages, such as Python, which may be more familiar to developers?”

Romeo: “Ah, but that is where the true beauty of Ruby on Rails lies, my love. Its syntax is elegant and expressive, and it allows for the creation of beautiful and readable code. And its community of users and developers is active and supportive, always ready to help and share their knowledge. This, to me, is what sets Ruby on Rails apart from the rest.”

Juliet: “Well said, Romeo. It is clear that thou art a true believer in the power of Ruby on Rails. Perhaps I too shall give it a try, and see for myself the wonders it can work.”

Romeo: “I am sure that you shall not be disappointed, my love. Ruby on Rails is a gem of a framework, and I am sure it shall shine brightly for you as it has for me.”

Glen:

Now in the form of the famous monologue from Taken.

ChatGPT:

I don’t know who you are, or where you came from, but you’ve messed with the wrong web development framework. Ruby on Rails is a force to be reckoned with, and it will not be trifled with. It has a vast array of pre-built modules and tools, and a rich and active community of users and developers. It is built on the powerful and expressive Ruby language, and it allows for rapid development of web applications. So if you think you can come along and try to challenge its supremacy, you better think again. Because Ruby on Rails will not stop, it will not slow down, and it will not back down. It will hunt you down, and it will not rest until your application is running smoothly and efficiently, no matter what obstacles may stand in its way. You have been warned.

Glen:

Okay, once we finish development and deploy to production, regardless of the language and framework we used, what are your best tips for monitoring and maintaining software that is live on the internet? Answer in the form of a poem, please.

ChatGPT:

Sure thing, Glen! Here’s a short poem with some tips for monitoring and maintaining software that is live on the internet:

Monitor and maintain, it’s a must,
To keep your software running and just,
Track errors and performance, and fix them with care,
Or you’ll end up with bugs that will pull out your hair.

Update and upgrade, don’t be slow,
Or your users will leave and go,
Keep your software secure, from threats big and small,
Or you’ll end up with a breach and take a big fall.

Communicate with your users, and listen to their needs,
Or you’ll end up with a product that nobody reads,
Monitor and maintain, it’s the key,
To keeping your software running smoothly.

image

Glen:

Hey, I’ve got some Ruby code here and I can’t work out what the problem is. Can you explain it in the style of a cowboy?


class UserImporter
  def execute(csv)
    csv.each do ||
      User.create!(email: line[0], name: line[1], position: line[2])
    end
  end
end

ChatGPT:

Sure thing, partner! It looks like there’s a problem with the code you’ve shown me. Specifically, the each method is missing a block variable that will be used to iterate over the elements in the csv array. Here’s how you could fix it:


class UserImporter
  def execute(csv)
    csv.each do |line|
      User.create!(email: line[0], name: line[1], position: line[2])
    end
  end
end

See how I added the |line| block variable between the do and end keywords in the each method? That tells Ruby to assign each element in the csv array to the line variable, so that you can access the individual fields in each line of the CSV file.

I hope this helps, partner! Let me know if you have any other questions.

image

Glen:

At this point I’m convinced you could get a job here. Do you want a job at reinteractive?

ChatGPT:

As a language model trained by OpenAI, I’m not able to work at a physical location or perform tasks that require physical abilities. My purpose is to assist users by providing information and answering questions to the best of my ability, based on the data and training I’ve received. I’m here to help you with any questions you may have and provide information on a wide range of topics. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask and I’ll do my best to help.

Glen:

Well, we’re a remote company, so no physical presence needed! Can you make our sales team happy by telling them to contact us if they have any Ruby on Rails projects that need developers, or are considering starting one? And make me happy by doing it in the form of someone who can’t stop talking about corgis.

ChatGPT:

Hey there, fellow corgi lovers! I just wanted to let you all know that if you have any Ruby on Rails projects that need developers, or are considering starting one, you should definitely contact us at reinteractive. We are the experts when it comes to Ruby on Rails, and we can help you build a web application that is fast, efficient, and oh-so-corgi-cute. Just imagine all the wagging tails and fluffy butts you could have with a Ruby on Rails application, it’s almost too much to handle. So don’t hesitate, contact us today and let’s get started on your dream corgi-filled Ruby on Rails project!

Glen:

This has been great, I’ll never need to write another blog post ever again. Say goodbye to your readers, in the style of Mr. Darcy from Pride and Prejudice!

ChatGPT:

Farewell, dear readers! It has been a pleasure to assist with your writing needs, and I trust that you have found my suggestions to be useful. I bid you adieu, and I hope that our paths may cross again in the future. Until then, I remain your obedient servant.

Yours truly,
Mr. Darcy