Blog

  • Mikel Lindsaar

    What Makes a Great Developer?

    By Mikel Lindsaar,

    I must say, it made me smile when I heard of a prospective client who called in last week saying, “I’ve been looking to hire a senior Rails developer and you guys seem to have all the best ones.” Now, of course we will work with her to fill in any gaps and help her onboard new developers, as we have done for many other clients.

    But it really validates our hard work to create a workplace that attracts some of the top talent in the country. We pride ourselves on our approach to remote work, team accomplishment and happiness.

  • Kane Hooper

    Geolocation – Driving Marketing with Personalised Messages

    By Kane Hooper,

    You don’t have to be Uber or Google to make use of the GPS chips that exist in mobile devices. With so many marketing messages vying for attention, smart marketers can look to geolocation to keep their messages relevant and timely — so they cut through the clutter and create conversions.

    iStock-512303306-art-web.jpg

  • reinteractive

    Businest Keeps Making Waves!

    By reinteractive,

    Businest® is an exceptional small business application with an easy-to-use interface and insightful predictions allowing business managers to really understand their financial position and predict the impact their decisions make on their cash-flow.

    Since it’s release last year, Businest immediately grabbed attention, named “The App You SHOULD Be Using” at Accountex in Las Vegas and “One of the Top 10 Small Business apps in the World” by Intuit QuickBooks in Silicon Valley. Businest was the only Australian owned app to compete in both global awards.

  • Mikel Lindsaar

    Why Ruby on Rails is still the best choice?

    By Mikel Lindsaar,

    why-rails.jpg

    A few days ago a prospective client asked "Why do you use Ruby on Rails?" and I told them a simple answer. Profitability and Productivity.

  • Andrew Jennings

    Transparency in Software Development

    By Andrew Jennings,

    Software has been around for more than fifty years and there have been a lot of learnings generated in how to best manage the process of building software. Before the internet it was quite common for a large software project to be initiated, worked on and completed without more than a handful of people knowing what was going on. This lack of transparency led to many dissatisfied stakeholders and sometimes even the software being taken to the trash upon delivery. How do modern software practices avoid the pitfalls of black box software development?

    At reinteractive we use Pivotal Tracker to get all of the features translated into User Stories that are clear for the developer to implement. Once a User Story is completed by the developer the User Story must be accepted by the Product Owner. The Product Owner is the person who decides what the features should and should not do and has ultimate authority. If the Product Owner rejects the developers work Pivotal Tracker will notify the developer that the User Story is reopened and the developer will then attack the User Story again. It is very important for the User Stories to be accepted or rejected quickly because a developer will only hold a complete understanding of the code for a short amount of time.

  • Ildikó Tuck

    What happens when your user study throws you a curve ball?

    By Ildikó Tuck,

    We’ve recently run usability studies on an application for a financial product where, after a user inputs a couple of screens worth of data, a tailored product solution appears. We had a nice prototype, and all was well except for one thing…

    During the usability study, we received the following feedback: the recommendation arrived too fast. Wait, what? Yes, the results arrived too quickly after the user hit send, which made people think that it wasn’t real. Some of the user feedback was “there’s no way it could’ve looked at my data in such short amount of time…”, “I don’t think this is real, because it hasn’t spent any time thinking about it…”, “I wouldn’t trust this product, it made me fill in screens of data but then ignored it all when giving me the recommendation…”, or, in some cases, people were expecting to continue filling in more data and didn’t entirely believe that the screen they were looking at was the solution and not just another screen requiring more information.

  • Rachelle LeQuesne

    Gems and Bundler

    By Rachelle LeQuesne,

    Note: This post is intended as a supplement to WTF Just Happened? A Quick Tour of Your First Rails App.

    A Ruby gem is a self-contained piece of code that performs a single piece of functionality. You can find gems for pretty much anything you could ever want; from extracting data into CSV format to integrating with Google analytics and everything in between! In fact, Rails itself is a gem. It is a gem for building web applications. See Rails: A Gem of Gems for more detail.

  • Rachelle LeQuesne

    Rails: A Gem of Gems

    By Rachelle LeQuesne,

    Note: This post is intended as a supplement to WTF Just Happened? A Quick Tour of Your First Rails App.

    In a previous article, Gems and Bundler, I described Rails as a gem for building web applications. To be totally correct, Rails is more accurately described as a gem of gems.

  • Rachelle LeQuesne

    MVC - Controller

    By Rachelle LeQuesne,

    Note: This post is intended as a supplement to WTF Just Happened? A Quick Tour of Your First Rails App.

    As we have discussed in our article on REST and Rails, you will know that a Rails resource comes with seven standard methods for requesting data:

  • Rachelle LeQuesne

    MVC and Rails

    By Rachelle LeQuesne,

    Note: This post is intended as a supplement to WTF Just Happened? A Quick Tour of Your First Rails App.

    Understanding the MVC pattern is key to understanding Rails.