Blog

  • Ildikó Tuck

    What is a Clickable Prototype?

    By Ildikó Tuck,

    Perhaps the most common question after "How are you?" in any context is “So, what do you do for a living?" If you’re a UX designer, answering that will get complicated quickly. Because, even though the field has been around for a while now, many people - even those working in IT - still aren’t sure what exactly UX is.

    Anyone working in this field for any significant amount of time would have the “off-the shelf” answer that doesn’t turn into a 5-minute soapbox moment where we explain what UX is and why it matters (so much!!). My answer is “it’s kind of like engaging an architect for a house, I create a blueprint for web apps that tells everyone where everything needs to go. And then I talk to people about it”. That answer is usually plenty complicated to yield some confused looks.

  • Rhiana Heath

    Simple CSSGrids for IE

    By Rhiana Heath,

    Yes you can use CSS Grid in IE 10 and 11, it’s just a different version so the syntax is a bit different. On the plus side though, it doesn’t interfere with your current CSS Grid setup. :-)

    Did you know that a Grid system was originally developed for Internet Explorer 10 (IE10) back in 2011? It was submitted to the W3C and, while a great start, it was not complete. They worked on it some more to develop the CSS Grid system we use today. So there are some similarities between the two, but the IE one is set up in a different way in parallel. Read more about the whole story here.

  • Carl Neumann

    Is it time to re-design?

    By Carl Neumann,

    0

    'Don’t judge a book by its cover' is a well-known cliché. And, while I agree completely with the principle, I’m the first to admit I’m guilty of it just the same. Today, more than ever, users are inclined to purchase based on packaging or advertising where contents may be identical or similar.

  • Rhiana Heath

    Accessibility on Rails

    By Rhiana Heath,

    accessibility-on-rails

    As your audience grows, it is important to ensure that your website or application can be used by everyone - specifically people with permanent or temporary disabilities. This is often referred to as accessibility (or A11y as an abbreviation), and is a requirement for all modern websites or applications.

  • Rhiana Heath

    Presenting SVG Graphs

    By Rhiana Heath,

    Recently I had the task of taking assessment data and drawing it on a graph so that it matched the design below:

    sales-skills-assessment

  • Rhiana Heath

    Should I use a front-end framework?

    By Rhiana Heath,

    When creating a new webpage or app, there comes a time to decide: should I use a front-end framework (like Bootstrap) or write my own CSS (front-end code) from scratch?

    As a front-end developer, I get asked this question a lot. I have worked on many projects in a number of different ways and, like anything, there are pros and cons to both. I will go through a few factors to consider, and review some front-end frameworks that I have used in the past.

  • Rhiana Heath

    The Five W's of Accessibility

    By Rhiana Heath,

    The internet is the perfect medium for people with disabilities. It breaks down barriers, brings people together, and allows them access to information that, in turn, empowers them.

    Australia's recent postal survey raised the issue of how inaccessible it was for people with disabilities or for whom English is not their first language. These people were unable to vote without assistance. Had this survey been conducted on the internet, everyone could vote, regardless of where they live, and whatever their disability or native language.

  • Ildikó Tuck

    Should I listen to my UX consultant or implement my own vision?

    By Ildikó Tuck,

    Today some 89% of Australians are consumers of digital content and we have a seemingly endless selection of it to choose from. Given our vast choice of content, we, as users became increasingly more discerning.

    It wasn’t too long ago when we were happy if an app had a mobile version or a responsive site. Now, the options available mean that we will not put up with anything less than delightful. And, once we find that piece of delightful software, we tend to stick to it. We all know this first-hand, being daily consumers of digital content and knowing our own devices intimately. With the importance users place on their experience with today’s online content, entrepreneurs building new software are usually fully aware that they require UX, and they need it to be excellent.

  • Ildikó Tuck

    What happens when your user study throws you a curve ball?

    By Ildikó Tuck,

    We’ve recently run usability studies on an application for a financial product where, after a user inputs a couple of screens worth of data, a tailored product solution appears. We had a nice prototype, and all was well except for one thing…

    During the usability study, we received the following feedback: the recommendation arrived too fast. Wait, what? Yes, the results arrived too quickly after the user hit send, which made people think that it wasn’t real. Some of the user feedback was “there’s no way it could’ve looked at my data in such short amount of time…”, “I don’t think this is real, because it hasn’t spent any time thinking about it…”, “I wouldn’t trust this product, it made me fill in screens of data but then ignored it all when giving me the recommendation…”, or, in some cases, people were expecting to continue filling in more data and didn’t entirely believe that the screen they were looking at was the solution and not just another screen requiring more information.

  • Ildikó Tuck

    What exactly is a UX review? Do we need it?

    By Ildikó Tuck,

    Lately, I’ve received a few questions about what a user experience review / heuristic review or evaluation / UX expert review is and isn’t and when it’s a good idea to have one. I thought I’d share a few of the questions and answers on what it is, what you can expect from it and roughly what sort of commitment it requires from a businesses’ viewpoint.

    Let’s start with the common element in all three of the above-mentioned names for it. Yes, it’s a review. It evaluates an existing system against best-practices in the industry. It is performed by an expert in user experience design or Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and results in a report with key findings and action items that you can use to improve your product. It’s a so-called “inspection method” because it doesn’t involve users but it is based on principles derived from watching users interact with online systems. It results in a list of issues found and ranked by severity - usually a scale of 5 (minor, low, moderate, high, critical), but some UX designers use a different system.